Using Twitter for Link Building: All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us!

SEO

Using Twitter for Link Building: All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us!

All this talk of link building will probably never die. Until Google makes any major changes in their algorithm (which will probably be…not soon,) that will always be an integral part of the SEO world.

So, this leads us to all sorts of tactics being used from cold calls (or outreach through email,) to trying to establish a legitimate relationship by networking with various websites/people in your niche. Some of us try to analyze every last word we send in an email when requesting a guest post.

Let’s talk Twitter. Twitter is the real-time update of people’s shared thoughts. Since Twitter has a 29% response rate (with the data arguably being skewed, making it look less than it really is), advertisers/marketers/people looking for a response naturally go to Twitter, and fully expect a response from their followers sooner than later.

So…How Do We Utilize Twitter Efficiently and Effectively?

Well, there are a couple of ways. We could do it the old-fashioned way where we hit the inter-webs for hours at a time every day searching for every possible word combination that will lead us to potentials in guest posting, or other forms of content requests.

Like I said, that’s the old-fashioned way. We’re young for a reason.

IFTTT (If This Than That) allows us to scan twitter and set up conditional rules that allow us to place our tweets where we want them.

This was my first test with the Twitter world. I set up a recipe on IFTTT that would send any tweets to me that mentioned words like “guess post available,” “looking for contributors,” or “post on my awesome site and I’ll let you put an awesome (relevant) link on it.” Ok, maybe the latter was a bit of a farce.

But then Twitter took their ball and left the playground. They stopped allowing IFTTT to use their API to facilitate tweets where you could potentially store them where you wish. (This is no more a slam on Twitter than it is an endorsement for IFTTT, however I do love IFTTT for many other purposes it can create for your liking.)

This didn’t mean we had to start from zero. We already knew that there was a market for finding guest post opportunities in congruence to our respective niches. Oh, and did I mention I connected with three different sites that all let me contribute content to their site with a link? Yeah, pretty sweet. All in a day’s work.

Enter Monitter and Tweet Deck

Monitter is a web-based application that still uses the twitter API (keep your fingers crossed,) it allows you to search for different word combinations to your customization. i.e. “guest post available,” “looking for contributors,” etc.

Tweet Deck allows you to do the same thing, however, tweet deck also lets you save past searches.

Monitter on the other hand, let’s you localize searches, if your niche requires a certain city, this can be very beneficial. For example, if you’re looking to get links for hotels in Denver, you’re probably going to want to look for specific blogs/sites that are catered towards Denver.

Keep in mind, I’ve been using this for about two weeks, so there is plenty for me to learn, and I would love to hear your suggestions or anything you’ve learned in the process that can improve search customization.

And Then There Was Ethan (@ethanlyon)

Seer Interactive’s Ethan gave an awesomely detailed post on his creation that also utilizes twitter. To summarize, Ethan uses Twitter’s API to pull the terms “guest post” from Twitter feeds. It also allows you to customize it to your niche so it will be more relevant to you.

There is a disclaimer in his article stating that it can, from time to time, pull those words from an article that mentions “guest post”, I used it this week for the first time, and within the first five minutes found a PR 6 site that accepts guest posts. Showing major potential with this tool.

So, hopefully this opens up new doors for you. Add this to your list of tactics for link building and keep me posted on how it goes.

About the Author

Harper Anderson is an account manager for 97th Floor. You can reach him in the comment section (if this article gets read by more than seven people) on Twitter, Facebook, or Google +. Or you could do it the old-fashioned way through email at harper@97thfloor.com.

Comments

One Response to “Using Twitter for Link Building: All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us!”

  1. Html emails says:

    Great post Harp! It is really useful tool in link building. I’ve read Etan’s post a while ago in Search Engine LanD newsletter and since then i found some good links for my clients.

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