<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none;" alt="" src="https://dc.ads.linkedin.com/collect/?pid=31884&amp;fmt=gif">

Request a call

or call us at 801.341.1986

Conversion Killers in Copywriting

There’s a lot of work that goes into getting customers to the right page. But often you’ll find that once they’re there, they aren’t converting. That’s probably because you’re making a simple mistake that is killing all those leads. I’ll give you a list of five of those possible killers, but it’s up to you to crack the case and uncover the real reason your leads are not converting.

  1. It’s all about me, me, me

We’re all to blame for this one. Constantly we talk about how WE have been doing and what recognitions WE have been given, but the customer doesn’t care about us. They care about themselves. So let them know what you can do for THEM. Shoot for content that is 80% about them and 20% about you. Your product isn’t what makes your business. People using your product is. Below is an example of a conversion killer and how you can fix it.

Bad:

“We strive to help businesses grow through our product that will increase traffic and brand recognition. We focus on the fundamentals that drive success and we want to help you. Our services include x,y, and z.”

Better:

“Built for clients who want to increase traffic and brand recognition. Get the success you’ve been looking for without all the nonsense.”

  1. You don’t understand the customer

Many times when we write copy for a customer, we assume we know who they are, but that’s not always the case. We know parts of who they are and fill in the blanks for the rest (ex: They’re a man, so they must love sports). It’s important to know your customer before they find your company, while they used your product, and after. You want to know their pain points, priorities, and hesitations at each of these stages.

The only way to know all of this is by asking. Find a few loyal customers and ask them questions about each part of their journey with your company. Here are a few example questions:

  • Why did you go looking for something to solve X problem?
  • What did you hope to get out of using ___ product?
  • What was your first impression of ___?
  • How has our product changed your life or made it better?
  1. You assume they know

Don’t assume your customers know everything about your industry or product. Sometimes people are just starting out in their search for the perfect product and if your copy is written for top level executives, they might not consider you. Make your copy descriptive and readable for customers at every point of the buyer’s journey. Again, the best way to figure out what your customers know, is to ask them.

  1. You give into the clichés

Once again, we’re all to blame for this one. We give into the thought that customers will be lured in by the flashy adjectives on our pages.

“High-quality mattresses!” “Powerful integrations!” “Leader in automotive care!”

But they aren’t. They care most about what those things mean. Instead of “high-quality mattresses,” they want to know that means support, comfort, and a mattress that will give them a full night of sleep. Be specific. All the flashiness gets in the way from the true meaning and can turn people away from something that could actually benefit them.

Go through your content and act like a toddler. Ask “why?” a thousand times. If people are having to connect the dots to understand what your product does, odds are you’re losing them.

  1. The CTA makes people feel weird

You’ve seen it before. A new product comes on the market. There website looks great, but then “Get Started Today!” What’s going to happen if you click on that button? No one really knows.

If you yourself are a little hesitant to click the button, what’s stopping your customers from feeling the same way? People want to know what they’re getting themselves into, so let them know. If you’re a vacation booking site, make your CTA “Book Now!” An insurance agency: “Get a Quote.” Think to yourself “I want to ____” and use that blank as your call to action. If that doesn’t work, combine the desired outcome with the required action. Below is an example.

are you overpaying

Now you know some of the killers attacking your conversions and how to fix them. Get to work and solve the case!

Ashton Stanworth

Ashton is a marketer at 97th Floor.

You might also be interested in

There are no related posts

pankaj-patel-721645-unsplash-1

Help Me Help You - What is CRO and How to Optimize Your Conversion Funnel

read more

tom cruise gif help me help you

Mastermind Conference

Watch the full 2019 Mastermind conference.

watch the keynotes