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Interview with John Scott V7 on the new contextual links service

In light of all the attention the V7 post has gotten today John Scott was cool enough to let me ask him some questions regarding the new service. Overall I am excited about it. Here is what we talked about.

>How long have you been testing the service privately?

We've been running the program in beta for two weeks now, and the demand we experienced while running it in beta forced us to take it public, in order to meet advertiser needs.

>How many sites do you have in your database?

Right now we have under one hundred blog publishers in the database. Fortunately, some of those blog publishers are professional blog publishers who maintain more than a few blogs, many with high traffic and strong link foundations.

To be quite honest, we have had to ask advertisers to pace themselves. Advertisers who wish to order 500 links are being turned down. We are orders of 100 links maximum at this time, and we will be reaching out to blog publishers in a big way to fix this problem.

>I know you have a large network within the V7 regime, but I would assume most of your followers would be webmaster and computer related. Do you have a good database of sites for all industries?

I was surprised myself to find that we have members blogging in several different topics €œ from travel, to education and cooking to travel €œ webmasters tend to have varied interests. The best blogs, in my opinion, are the personal ones. They have good link popularity and cover a wide variety of topics.

> Are you going to offer an affiliate program?

This was suggested, but at this time we feel that affiliate programs would reach out to advertisers more than blog publishers. If we decide to contact every customer who ever did a paid submission to the web directories that we've run, we will have more advertisers than we can deal with. Instead of advertisers, we want to reach blog publishers.

>Can you outline very quickly how the actual sign up process for advertisers?

Advertisers sign up via the form on the site after agreeing to the non-disclosure agreement, make payment and wait. We contact advertisers within 24 hours and get to know them, and answer any questions they may have. We do not reveal our inventory at this point.

We then search our database for eligible blogs, we get the links placed on those blogs, and send the list of URL's where the links were placed to the advertiser. Order fulfilled.

>What types of checks will you put into place to help monitor the link and its existence.

Blog publishers are contractually obligated to make a good faith effort to keep the link active for at least a year. Blog publishers are prohibited from removing the link as long as they operate the website. Blog publishers may not “nofollow" the link. We have a non-disclosure agreement that both advertiser and publisher must agree too, prohibiting both parties from revealing the paid status of the link.

We manually review the websites to ensure compliance. Of all the enterprises that we have been involved in, this one is the most human resources intensive. Search engines detect automation; we counter that by using the human touch to keep everything unique, and to provide the best support to both advertisers and publishers.

>Anything else you want everyone to know.

Bloggers: we need you! If you have a blog with quality content, decent traffic and links, we need you!

Thanks John,

I think it is going to be sweet!

 

Chris Bennett

Chris Bennett is the Founder and CEO of 97th Floor.

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