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The Individual Browser

I was thinking about some really great conversations I have had lately with a good friend about monetizing website traffic, and the power of the "individual browser".

Right off the bat I am going to ask for feedback on this because I want to hear all sides. Depending on the industry you are in, when it comes to making money with ads, affiliate banners, etc.. the "individual browser" is what matters the most. If you are in an industry where you are providing information to only "affiliate managers" there is a good chance that not many of them are actually going to click on your affiliate ads on your site (since most know exactly where they are and what they look like).

What do you do in a situation like this? What do you do when you have a topic that is a great niche, and you are getting a crazy amount of traffic every single day but hardly making a cent because users of your site are aware of all the money making methods you are using?

I say it will pay off in the long run. If you can be patient and keep building up domain authority, page rank and back links then eventually you will be able to sell text links, and have valuable "real estate" space on your site (so to speak). People will come to you and pay good money (some text links I have see have been up to 700$/month, and I know some go higher) to get their site more traffic and more visibility within the search engines.

Enjoy the traffic you are getting and don't knock the sources where its coming from. You are building a brand for yourself and in time will be a huge money maker. It all comes back to "authority" online and if you are building your site as an "authority site" it can only mean long term success in my opinion.

Thoughts?

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